Deborah Finegold’s new book: “Music”.

Madonna looks like she has been sucking on that red lollipop all day, her hair teased to 1980s perfection and her right arm lined with black bangles. She peers into the camera as if she’s about to wink, already aware that she’ll soon be one of the most famous pop stars in the world.

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Deborah Finegold’s new book: “Music”.

Madonna looks like she has been sucking on that red lollipop all day, her hair teased to 1980s perfection and her right arm lined with black bangles. She peers into the camera as if she’s about to wink, already aware that she’ll soon be one of the most famous pop stars in the world.
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Credit: SHORE FIRE MEDIA

An early portrait of Madonna on the cusp of fame in 1983, it’s also a testament to photographer Deborah Feingold’s finely tuned sense of her subjects and the qualities that make them special. That picture is one of several iconic images that make up Feingold’s new book, “Music,” her first-ever anthology, with an introduction by music journalist Anthony DeCurtis.
Damiani publishing will publish the book on Sept. 30, plus there will be an in-store signing at Porter Square Books in Cambridge on Sept. 25.


Q. Your photos of Madonna took on a life of their own.
A. I have no explanation for that. It was a 20-minute shoot in my apartment that was so tiny that all my furniture folded up against the wall, including the bed, table, and chairs. I was all set up. I had one assistant. She came with Liz Rosenberg, who remained her publicist. Her makeup was ready to go. I had a bowl of lollipops, Tootsie Rolls, and bubble gum. I probably didn’t get paid or have a budget; hence a bowl of lollipops and bubble gum. Everything was very simple. I shot four rolls of film, and for every frame she changed it up. It was like a dance, and I was a good follower. I had the skill, but she led. Twenty minutes later, she knew we had finished, and she left. She was a working girl, I was there to work, and that’s what you see.

Madonna’s first ever performance at Danceteria in New York City, 1985. “Haoui Montaug had a cabaret once a month and he would pay you 20 bucks to perform. I think she did 'Everybody.'” From photographer Josh Cheuse’s “Grooving Years” exhibition.

Madonna’s first ever performance at Danceteria in New York City, 1985. “Haoui Montaug had a cabaret once a month and he would pay you 20 bucks to perform. I think she did 'Everybody.'” From photographer Josh Cheuse’s “Grooving Years” exhibition.

Pre-order Madonna’s 2015 Calendar Now!

The 2015 Madonna calendar is now available for pre-order from her official online store. Be one of the first 200 to pre-order and get a free 24 X 36 inches poster print of the original photo used to create the calendar’s cover art!! www.madonna.com/store

Pre-order Madonna’s 2015 Calendar Now!
The 2015 Madonna calendar is now available for pre-order from her official online store. Be one of the first 200 to pre-order and get a free 24 X 36 inches poster print of the original photo used to create the calendar’s cover art!! www.madonna.com/store

Stuart Price and the Truth About Madonna’s ‘Confessions’

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Stuart Price has an  and unprecedented aliases. He also joins the short list of regular Madonna contributors, first working with the pop icon on her Drowned World tour in 2001 and later producer her acclaimed 2005 dance record, Confessions on a Dance Floor. Price recently spoke to THUMP’s Bruce Tantum about the experience of making the album nearly a decade ago.

Right before we made Confessions on a Dance Floor, I had made a record with a girl named Juliet [2005’s Random Order]; we had made that album over Thanksgiving in New York, when the city was completely dead, and it was just the two of us concentrating on working on it. [I went] straight from that to Madonna, and I assumed that would be a much different experience, but she completely surprised me.

The real eye-opener was about how focused she was on avoiding the kind of over-the-top, excessive, entourage-in-the-studio environment that I had expected. It was the total opposite, really. She helped to create an environment where we were like two kids working together in a studio. It was exactly the same feeling as it was when I was working with Juliet. She was really… I don’t want to say “smart,” but she was really honest about music. She’s really instinctive in understanding that dance music comes from a very minimal way of working. It doesn’t come from throwing lots of money on a lavish production.

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We spent five or six weeks in my apartment; the studio used to be upstairs in the loft. I would work on a track overnight, then she would come in and we’d start messing around. She would do vocal melodies and I would come up with a few ideas, and then she’d go, “Okay, I’m gonna go home and think about it.” Then she’d come back the next day and have the hook for “Hung Up” or the chorus for “Sorry.” Then I would carry on working on more tracks to keep us going. It was more of a really fluid and almost childlike environment than anything that seemed too serious.

They always say that an album sounds like the time that you had making it. I know that with that album, it was a super-productive time, but it was also really fun and natural. And I think that comes across in the way it sounds.

It’s surprising that Madonna has such a simple work mode. I would have expected her to come in with her full entourage and play the diva, at least to some extent.

Well, don’t get me wrong—I think in a lot of parts of her life, she is the big-entourage person. But when it comes to being creative, she’s unexpectedly low-key. She’s great to work with, and I really mean that.

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1985 Outtakes by Herb Ritts

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Zane Lowe talks to Diplo about his collaboration with Skrillex called Jack U, the new song featuring Kiesza and working with Madonna.

Diplo reveals the first single from Madonna13 was finished last week, but still needs to be fine tuned and mixed.

The new album will contain about 5 or 6 songs from his sessions.

There’s a retrospective song about her career which includes old samples of her music and news reports about her.

Track: Zane Lowe Feature Interview - Diplo

Madonna last night at Jeremy Scott’s after party with Diplo and Skrillex in New York.

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Madonna with Diplo and Skrillex at Space Ibiza in New York at Jeremy Scott’s after party last night.